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nastyotter:

superblys:

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gameandwatch:

fucking watch this

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this was my tag and i got 21 messages telling me to watch it - you need to watch this

IM FUCKONG CRYING THE FUCKING TRAIN AND HOLY shHIT

nastyotter:

superblys:

zabvza:

gameandwatch:

fucking watch this

how real is this

this was my tag and i got 21 messages telling me to watch it - you need to watch this

IM FUCKONG CRYING THE FUCKING TRAIN AND HOLY shHIT

griseus:

MANTIS SHRIMP SIGHT

Even though the eye-catching mantis shrimp has 12 different color receptor cones (compared to humans’ three for red, blue, and green), it may be worse at discerning colors.

The dark areas of the eye are called the pseudopupil, is created by the facets of the eye that are looking directly at you. You will notice that the mantis shrimp often has three separate pseudopopils in each eye looking at you, this gives them trinocular depth perception in each eye independently. You will also sometimes see the pseudopupils get very large. This is when the animal points the acute zone of the eye at you. The acute zone has much greater resolution than the rest of the eye, and is analogous to our fovea.

  • Gif 1 footage by Michael Bok
  • Gif 2: showing pseudopupils in the eyes of a male Odontodactylus scyllarus. The right eye is damaged by RoyLCaldwell
  • More: Nature

emergentfutures:

Computers are providing solutions to math problems that we can’t check

Good news! A computer has solved the longstanding Erdős discrepancy problem! Trouble is, we have no idea what it’s talking about — because the solution, which is as long as all of Wikipedia’s pages combined, is far too voluminous for us puny humans to confirm.

A few years ago, the mathematician Steven Strogatz predicted that it wouldn’t be too much longer before computer-assisted solutions to math problems will be beyond human comprehension. Well, we’re pretty much there. In this case, it’s an answer produced by a computer that was hammering away at the Erdős discrepancy problem.

Full Story: Io9

mindblowingscience:

Scientists Create Artificial Blood That Can Be Produced On An Industrial Scale: A Limitless Supply Of Blood?

Scientists have found a way to produce human blood, potentially on an industrial scale — thanks to a certain University of Edinburgh professor, Marc Turner, and his program’s funds from the Wellcome Trust.

With this new method, scientists hope they’ll produce a sort of “limitless” supply of type-Ored blood cells, free of diseases and able to be transfused into any patient. Blood transfusions are used to replace lost blood after an injury or surgery. According to the National Institutes of Health, every year five million Americans require blood transfusions.

Through the use of pluripotent stem cells — regular cells removed from thehuman bodyand then transformed into stem cells — Turner and his team of researchers were able to create blood type Ored blood cells. The technique will be tested in live humans for the first time, in a trial running through 2016 or 2017. In the experiments, researchers will test the artificial blood on people who have thalassaemia, a blood disorder that requires several transfusions.

“Although similar research has been conducted elsewhere, this is the first time anybody has manufactured blood to the appropriate quality and safety standards for transfusion into a human being,” Turner told The Telegraph.

Continue Reading.

sagansense:

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.

image

Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles.

image

Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.

imageNow what? Read the whole story over at PopSci

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